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Romanian Fighter Colours, 1941-1945

White • 2010
Autor(zy)Dan Melinte, Teodor Liviu Morosanu
IlustratorTeodor Liviu Morosanu
ISBN 978-83-89450-90-6
Data wydania2010-10-18
SeriaWhite
Nr katalogowy9111
KategoriaSold Out KategoriaWyprzedana
FormatA4, HB, 192 stron (192 w kolorze)
Cena122.00 PLN Cena24.99 GBP

Książka opisuje, a właściwie ilustruje zasady malowania wszytkich myśliwców używanych przez Rumunię od 1941 do 1945 roku.

Wiele niepublikowanych zdjęć oraz kolorowe ilustracje przedstawiają kamuflaż i oznaczenia takich myśliwców jak:

PZL P.11c

PZL P.24

Hurricane Mk I

Heinkel 112E

Bf 109E

Bf 109G

Bf 110

MiG-3

Fw 190F-8

Fw 190A-8

IAR 81/81

This book describes and illustrates all the fighter aircraft used by the Romanian armed forces during WW2. Covering both the indigenous designs employed early on through to the German fighters flown for much of the period, the camouflage and markings of these aircraft are described and illustrated in great detail.

Fully illustrated with many rare wartime photos. Full colour profiles of many representative aircraft.

Aircraft described:

PZL P.11c

PZL P.24

Hurricane Mk I

Heinkel 112E

Bf 109E

Bf 109G

Bf 110

MiG-3

Fw 190F-8

Fw 190A-8

IAR 81/81

Decals based on MMP book - Romanian Fighter Colours, 1941-1945 are available at RB Productions website.

1/32 Romanian Messerschmitt Bf 109E

1/48 Romanian Messerschmitt Bf 109E

1/72 Romanian Messerschmitt Bf 109E

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  • Amazon.com customer review (4th) • 2013-09-23

    5.0 out of 5 stars Superbe !, March 23, 2013

    By De Bast

    Perfect ! Lot of pictures. excellent writing. And describe about rares fighters in romanian air force such as bf 110 and FW 190.

  • Cybermodeler.com • 2013-09-23

    by Ray Mehlberger

    Date of Review October 2010

    The Romania Air Force used an interesting variety of fighter aircraft during WWII. They fought initially with the Axis, but later with the Allies. Romanian, Polish, British and German fighters were used with great bravery and no little success against much stronger opponents.

    This book describes in great detail the colors and markings applied to all fighter aircraft used by the Romanians from 1939 to 1945. It includes captured examples, illustrated with many rare photos. The book contains 236 black and white war time photos and 11 rare color ones. There are many color profiles, most of which look to be 1/32nd scale.

    87 of the black white photo show the pilots, either in the cockpits or standing next to their planes. Another 30 of them show the crews standing around the planes. A very few shots show crashed and damaged aircraft.

    It is a fascinating and invaluable look at a little known aspect of WWII aviation. Aircraft described are: PZL P.11, PZL P.24, IAR 80/81, Hawker Hurricane Mk. I, Messerschmitt Bf-109E, Messerschmitt Bf-109G, Messerschmitt Bf-110, Captured Mig-3 early type, Captured Polikarpov I-16 type 29 and Focke Wulf Fw 190.

    In the PZL P.11 chapter an illustration of white fin numbers, showing their size and shapes is provided, there are 2 color four-views (one of these includes color chips and their RLM numbers), 9 color side profiles (one with skis) and an illustration of a personal marking and an illustration of a squadron’s special kill marking.

    In the PZL P.24 chapter there are 4 color four-views (2 have the color ships and one of those 2 has the RLM numbers). There are 4 color side profiles.

    In the Hawker Hurricane Mk. I chapter there is an illustration of tail numbers and their size and shapes in yellow, 4 color four-views (with color chips), 5 color side profiles, an illustration of the 53rd Squadron’s logo of Mickey Mouse on horseback (this marking is repeated numerous times in illustrations of it throughout the book. Walt Disney characters were very popular with the Romanian squadrons it appears).

    In the Heinkel He-112 chapter there is an illustration of the black fuselage numbers and the white tail numbers used, with their size and shapes. There are 3 color four-views (with color chips and RLM numbers) and 7 color side profiles. The 5th Groups logo of Disney’s “Pluto” is shown and 2 pilot’s personal marks are illustrated.

    In the IAR 80/81 chapter there is an illustration of the letters, numbers and factory logos used in white and black, showing their sizes and shapes. There are color illustrations of propeller spinner color and stripe patterns. Included are 3 color four-views (with color chips and RLM numbers), 2 color three-views, the Group 9’s logo of a four leaf clover in color, 18 color side profiles (3 of these in co-belligerent roundels, used after Romanian switched sides over to the Allies on 23 August 1944), 3 pilot’s personal markings of girl friend’s names and a skull and cross-bones and Group 1’s logo of a winged V. Also illustrated in color is the 61st Squadron’s logo of Disney’s Bambi, which is shown several times.

    In the Bf-109E chapter the illustration of the 56th Squadrons logo of Disney’s Donald Duck is illustrated in color (this appears numerous times throughout the book). Also ground victory score marks are illustrated. Included are illustrations of yellow fuselage numbers used, with their sizes and shapes. There is 1 color four-view (with color chips and RLM numbers), 1 color three-view and 15 color side profiles.

    In the Bf-109G chapter there are illustrations of color and stripe patterns used on propeller spinners, 5 color four-views (with color chips and RLM numbers) One of these is in co-belligerent roundels. There is 1 color three-view. There are 27 color side profiles. One of these has a large American flag painted down the side of the fuselage. An color illustration of Group 9’s logo of a shield is included.

    In the Bf-110 chapter there are 3 color side profiles.

    In the captured Mig-3 early type chapter there is 1 color side profile.

    In the captured Polikarpov I-16 type 29 chapter there is also only 1 color side profile.

    There are 4 appendixes. These include:

    Romanian Unit Structure

    Romanian Aviation Ranks

    Table of the Types of Colors Identified by Codes

    Romanian Cross Insignia Variants and Sizes and

    Roundel Variants and Sizes

    The book ends with a bibliography

    The back cover of the book shows the cover art of “Bf-109 Late Versions, Camouflage & Markings” that has been reviewed here on Cybermodeler.

    This book will be of great interest to aircraft historians and enthusiasts and to modelers of these aircraft.

    Very highly recommended.

  • Modelingmadness.com • 2013-09-23

    Reviewer: Scott Van Aken

    This makes two superlative large format books in a row from MMP Books. I thought the Late Bf-109 book would be difficult to follow and yet, here is another excellent publication. This time it is on Fighters of the Romanian Air Force during WWII and it is hardbound. Specifically concentrating on colors and markings, this book also gives a darn good account of each type that was in service.

    A ll of the types used in combat are here. It includes the PZL P.11/24, Hurricane, He-112, the locally produced IAR-80/81/82, the Bf-109E and 109G as well as the Bf-110. It also includes captured fighters, specifically the I-16 and MiG-3 from the Soviets and the FW-190A/F versions from when the Romanians changed sides and started fighting the Germans in late 1944.

    Each section includes an operational history of each aircraft type with specifics about aerial victories as well as photos of as many of these planes as you have ever seen in one place. From those photos, there are huge profiles and sometimes three views of the aircraft. I found it particularly pleasing to notice that there were a considerable number of period color photos; a real bonus.

    In addition to the sections on each type and their particular camouflage and markings scheme, there are several appendices that cover unit and rank structures, as well as a color guide to a number of paint lines, something that will appeal to the modeler. Finally, a section on the different variations on the national insignia, and there are certainly more than one would think.

    This all makes for a truly epic work on a subject that has had little written on it. It is a book that I completely enjoyed reading and one that I know you will as well. It does sound like a broken record when I say this has my highest recommendation, but when books are this good, what more can I offer.

    November 2010

  • Amazon.co.uk customer review • 2013-09-23

    5.0 out of 5 stars

    A must have for modellers and historians., 26 Nov 2010

    By Mrs. A. Osborne "Mrs. HARRY POTTER, "Char... (Norfolk, England)

    Not much detailed reference material has been available on the Romanian Air Force in World war Two. Sadly overlooked for far too long, this aggresive fighting force performed very well against all opponents. This book, however, provides surprisingly detailed information on camouflage and markings of all fighters used by Romania between 1941 and 1945. It is obvious that a great deal of research and time has gone into this work and the authors should be proud to have set a new level of accuracy in both colour and marking interpretation. The quality colour drawings are supported by photographs of the relevant aircraft for the reader to study. An overview of each fighter type is followed by a collection of drawings of individual aircraft, even stencilling and personal markings are covered. The presentation throughout is concise and yet refreshing in its layout.

    This book should be on the want list for every modeller and historian of the Second World War period.

  • Amazon.com customer review • 2013-09-23

    5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book on the topic!,

    November 27, 2010 By R. Silva (Puerto Rico)

    This book is a great new resource for modelers and enthusiasts of the lesser known air forces of the Second World War. It was EXACTLY as good as I hoped it would be, and more. The book includes profiles of around 100 aircraft used by Romania in WWII (all fighters), and around half of them have top views, the other side profile, or a full 4-view of the plane. The artwork is superb, and is also supported by actual protographs. I had never seen so many diverse I.A.R.80 markings before having this book.

    Aircraft profiled in this book:

    P.11

    P.24

    Hurricane

    He 112

    I.A.R.80/81

    Me 109 E

    Me 109 G-2

    Me 109 G-6

    Also there is a chapter on captured Soviet and German aircraft with profiles.

    There is a condensed history within each aircraft type's chapter, including a few combat histories. Apart form this, there are color references in each profile's page of which colors were used, and a color table in the appendices showing FS595 and a few brand paint equivalents. A few other data tables, like Romanian aviator ranks, are included.

    Highly recommended!

  • Amazon.co.uk second customer review • 2013-09-23

    A must-have for anyone interested in the Romania Air Force in WW2, 29 Nov 2010

    By Rob

    I think the title of this post says it all. This new book really is a great one for anyone interested in the Romanian Air Force during WW2. The book only covers fighter aircraft but does so with lots of pictures (from various collections, most of which I have never seen before) as well as some great full color artwork of various combat aircraft. The book appears to be well researched and is the first time I have seen such a good work since buying a similar book on a trip to Bucharest. That said, this new book is much much better then that previous text.

    I am a modeler and this is an invaluable reference for doing up Romanian fighter aircraft. Now if some decal companies will only take the artwork from this great book and made a set of decals appropriate...well, then that would be great. In fact, I am a bit surprised that Mushroom / Stratus (the Publisher) hasn't followed suit with this like some of their rivals, Kagero, and produce decal sets to accompany such great books. Just a suggestion!

  • AIR Modeller nr 33 • 2013-09-23
    852.jpg
  • www.aerostories.org • 2013-09-23

    To anyone interested to the Romanian Air Force of WW2, as well to the ones interested in fighters in general and the Eastern front in particular, this is the book to get ! This book introduce all the fighters the Romanians used in action between 1941 and 1945. Each chapter is split between an historical text (illustrated with many photos some in colour), giving the main events the pilots flying the type were involved, a part which should have deserved to be expanded however, and the etxt is followed by a deep study of the camouflage and markings used by the type throughout the war. For this specific part, the study offers to the reader or modeller a 4-views colour profile and various others colour profiles presenting interesting schemes. The very good point is the insertion of the photo which served to make the profile allowing the reader to check the accuracy of the Artist in this task. Another good point, is the page showing all the variants of the Romanian roundels (no less than 12 between 1941 and 1944) making a very good reference source for aircraft modellers.

    No need to say that with this book, we are able to know much more about the PZL P.11, PZL P.24, Hurricane, Heinkel 112, IAR 80/81, Messerschmitt BF109 E & G, Messerschmitt Bf110 and other soviet captured fighters, without forgetting the rare FW-190. So, to make it short, a very instructive book on Romanian fighters.

    Highly Recommended

    Phil Listemann

  • www.worldwar2.ro Forum • 2013-09-23

    Recently I received a courtesy copy from the Polish Publisher.

    The first statement I must say is that no one should form any opinion about this book before he/she can hold it in his/her hands. The few scans posted on the 'net do not do justice to this beautifully produced book.

    Following a quick browsing it's clear that this particular book is one of the best ones ever published on Aeronautica Regala Romana (an extra kudos to the authors for using this full, official form of the name of the Rumanian air force, not shying away from the Royal appellation, as many Rumanian authors do).

    About the photomaterial, although I already knew about 90%, in the remaining 10% there are several gems I very much enjoyed (like the one on the top of page 138).

    The majority of the colour profiles are just like I imagined and very similar to how I instructed the artists of various books I authored to paint the colour profiles like.

    I will not engage on how the shades of various camouflage colours may have looked like - with one notable exception, detailed below - to reasons outlined in my previous post.

    In one short sentence, going to the point: "Jos cu palaria, domnilor!" (Off the hat in front of the gentlemen!).

    This having been said - without having the time to deep dive into the main text, or studying in great detail the profiles - I observed a few very minor issues regarding various details of the texts and markings applied on the aircraft that were missed.

    For example, on the He 112, the lettering aft the fuselage access panel 'Racord oxigen' is missing (only the text in front of the panel was given on page 57). On the photo I have of the very same aircraft, No. 29, the 'Michael's Cross' was applied on the fuselage sides without a master stencil. Or, on page 144, the text applied on the flaps actually called: 'NU CALCA ACI'. And so on. But all these are nit-picking, really.

    One major question stuck in my head: how did the authors reach the conclusion as what serial number one particular aircraft had, when only photo(s) of the airframe details are known (to me). There are many such cases, just to pick a couple: the '109G featured on page 163, or the famous 'Tumpi-Bumpi Flostomok!' see on page 174. By the way, I was looking for an English translation of this slogan, which I don't really grasp...

    Finally, the exception to the colours mentioned above is the interpretation of the artist of the RLM 74 Dunkelgrau, grünlich - the proper German term. In two reference books on the topic I have on my bookshelves, this particular colour is definitely as dark grey, with a slight green hue, and depicted accordingly.

    By contrary, on the upper view drawings featured in the book the colour certainly looks green, which was not the case. A

    lso, the RLM 75 is known as Mittelgrau, not Grauviolet. Accordingly, it's a pure mid-grey colour, without the purple hue shown in the book. Finally, the RLM 76 Lichtblau, as given by the name, was a light blue, not light grey, as shown in the book [although, there were not less than three different shades of this colour, the RLM 76, 76a (Graugrün) and 76b (Graublau). Perhaps the artist used the latter shade].

    However, all these do not detract virtually anything from the value of the book, which should be on the shelves of everyone interested in the colourful history of Aeronautica Regala Romana .

    Dénes Bernád

  • InternetModeler.com • 2013-09-23

    By Chris Banyai-Riepl

    Small air forces offer some interesting markings on common aircraft, but often times it is quite challenging to find information on those small air forces. This newest title in Mushroom Model Publications' White Series provides a solid reference on one of those small air forces, that of Romania. During the Second World War, Romania flew aircraft from both sides of the conflict, as well as fielding their own indigenous design, making for quite an eclectic mix of aircraft.

    As this is a book on the colors and markings of the individual aircraft, it is logically broken down into the aircraft types. These include separate chapters on the PZL P.11 and P.24, Hawker Hurricane, Heinkel He 112, IAR 80/81, Messerschmitt Bf 109E, Bf 109G, and Bf 110, Mikoyan Gurevich MiG-3, Polikarpov I-16, and Focke Wulf Fw 190A-8 & Fw 190F-8. The MiG-3, I-16, and Fw 190s were all captured aircraft that were impressed into service.

    Looking at each individual chapter, these have a detailed history of the type with the Romanian air force, including combat reports. Following this is the section detailing the colors and markings, and this part is quite thorough. There are detail drawings of aircraft numbers, for example, carefully researched to match the specific aircraft. Those numbers painted on the sides of the Hurricanes, for example, are of a different style than those on the He 112. Color illustrations highlight specific aircraft, with quite a few unit emblems and personal markings covered as well. Backing up the illustrations are plenty of photos, more than I have seen in other publications.

    With all of this information compiled into a single volume, we have a great single-point reference on anything one would be interested in with regards to Romanian fighters.

  • InternetModeler.com • 2013-09-23

    By Chris Banyai-Riepl

    Small air forces offer some interesting markings on common aircraft, but often times it is quite challenging to find information on those small air forces. This newest title in Mushroom Model Publications' White Series provides a solid reference on one of those small air forces, that of Romania. During the Second World War, Romania flew aircraft from both sides of the conflict, as well as fielding their own indigenous design, making for quite an eclectic mix of aircraft.

    As this is a book on the colors and markings of the individual aircraft, it is logically broken down into the aircraft types. These include separate chapters on the PZL P.11 and P.24, Hawker Hurricane, Heinkel He 112, IAR 80/81, Messerschmitt Bf 109E, Bf 109G, and Bf 110, Mikoyan Gurevich MiG-3, Polikarpov I-16, and Focke Wulf Fw 190A-8 & Fw 190F-8. The MiG-3, I-16, and Fw 190s were all captured aircraft that were impressed into service.

    Looking at each individual chapter, these have a detailed history of the type with the Romanian air force, including combat reports. Following this is the section detailing the colors and markings, and this part is quite thorough. There are detail drawings of aircraft numbers, for example, carefully researched to match the specific aircraft. Those numbers painted on the sides of the Hurricanes, for example, are of a different style than those on the He 112. Color illustrations highlight specific aircraft, with quite a few unit emblems and personal markings covered as well. Backing up the illustrations are plenty of photos, more than I have seen in other publications.

    With all of this information compiled into a single volume, we have a great single-point reference on anything one would be interested in with regards to Romanian fighters.

  • www.luftwaffe-experten.org Forum • 2013-09-23

    First of all I’d like to say that I prefer the A-4 sized HB format which is vastly superior to the A-5 sized issues from this publisher. I wish to see more of these larger format books!

    Each aircraft type is given a short illustrated history of its service and combat in Romanian service followed by a section with camouflage and markings.

    The type history is short but helpful in understanding each type’s service and combat value with the Romanian AF. The camouflage and marking sections are very well illustrated with landscape sized nice and detailed colour profiles accompanied with photos, some in colour, of each aircraft illustrated. The profiles describing typical or standard camouflage of a particular aircraft type are shown in four-view profiles. Emblems are often shown as enlarged colour drawings in connection with the aircraft profiles. Camouflage colours are listed together with small colour patches next to the four-view profiles. There are in some cases Romanian stencil markings with the profiles as for example with the Bf109Ga-4/Ga-6 four-view profile. I like the way profiles and photos of each object are shown together. vAt the end there are some useful appendices containing Romanian unit structure; Romanian aviation ranks; Colours identified by codes: FS equivalent, Gunze, Lifecolour, Xtracrylics. The last appendix is a helpful description of Romanian cross and cockade insignia with dimensions and colours. It is apparent that this title aims in particular towards modelers and flight simulator skin artists to which I believe the book is most helpful. I’d on the other hand say that it makes a very valuable addition to any book collection of WW2 aircraft and not the least for those interested in the Romanian Air Force in general and their use of German fighter aircraft in particular.

    Aircraft of German design covered are: He112E; Bf109E; Bf109G; Bf110; Fw190A-8; Fw190 F-8. For modelers there are many very colourful and interesting objects of German origin found here and to build. The Romanians must have flown some of the most colourful Bf109E and Gs. From the introduction part I can quote “….wore vivid colours; the painting could not properly be called camouflage as it made the planes much more conspicuous” (from mission report No.26, 52nd FG, 15th USAAF, 23 June 1944)

    I hope the above can be of help.

    Goran

  • Hyperscale.com • 2013-09-23

    Review Type: FirstRead

    Advantages:

    Excellent photographic coverage – some images not previously published; A plethora of competent colour profiles; a narrative that is both informative and pleasant to read.

    Disadvantages:

    Conclusion:

    There is not a lot of reliable information around on the colours and markings of Romanian fighter aircraft. This book helps to redress the balance and presents to the reader a wealth of information that covers not only the “regulation” aircraft, but the captured ones as well.

    Reviewed by Rob Baumgartner

    F i r s t R e a d

    All too often the colours of Romanian fighter aircraft are relegated to footnotes. This is unfortunate as it’s quite a fascinating story.

    Romania aligned itself with Germany and on 22 June 1941 went to war against the USSR. For the next three years the pilots of the Romanian fighter units fought against the Soviet forces. In doing so they helped to reclaim Bessarabia and Northern Bukovina, assist in the siege of Odessa, and also participate in the battles on the Stalingrad and Crimean Fronts.

    From August 1943, the Romanians had a new enemy in their skies to contend with. This was in the form of the USAAF and the following aerial campaigns were hard fought affairs. The superior Allied aircraft soon took their toll on the locals but despite being outnumbered 5:1, the Romanians still managed to score quite a few victories.

    In August 1944 Romania changed sides and was now fighting with the Allies against the declining might of the Luftwaffe. The result of all this is an intriguing array of subjects for the enthusiast to enjoy.

    The purpose of this book is to tell the story of these aircraft and specifically to concentrate on their camouflage and markings. There are no less than 100 profiles to do this and it’s all backed up with over 150 photographs, many not having been published before.

    A wide variety of machines are covered within the 192 pages. All of the colour artwork is beautifully rendered and the accompanying captions are informative and enlightening.

    It’s not just the aircraft that are focused on in this hard-backed A4 publication. The pilots are also discussed as well as the units they served with. Tables in the appendix help explain the structure of these combat elements and to explain the rank hierarchy with its British equivalents.

    To aid the modeller, a chart is included that lists dimensions for all the various types of crosses and roundels seen on Romanian aircraft. This is preceded by a comparison of aircraft colours matched to FS equivalents and popular hobby paints.

    There are two main categories that form the bulk of the chapters...”Fighter aircraft in Romanian service” and “Captured fighter aircraft in Romanian service”.

    The former discusses types such as the PZL P.11 and P.24, Hawker Hurricane Mk.I, Heinkel He 112E, IAR 80/81, and Messerschmitt’s Bf 109E, Bf 109G, and Bf 110.

    Captured aircraft are made up of the early MiG-3, Polikarpov I-16 type 29, Focke Wulf Fw 190 F-8, as well as the Fw 190 A-8.

    Conclusion

    There is certainly a lot of information to absorb in this book.

    The format is excellent in that the data is clearly laid out for easy reference. Having the aircraft’s colour profile next to the photo from whence it came is perfect. This makes it simple for the reader to see how the illustrator came to portray the subject.

    It was the dearth of information available that led the authors to study the topic and thus come up with this work. So with the help of numerous researchers and enthusiasts, we now have a publication that gives the topic some justice.

  • MAM February 2011 • 2013-09-23
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  • IPMSUSA.org • 2013-09-23

    Reviewed by: Pablo Bauleo, IPMS# 46363

    The Romanian Air Force in World War II saw extensive combat in the Eastern Front against the Soviet Air Force and against the USAAF and RAF in home defense roles. Later, in late 1944 Romania changed sides and saw combat against the Luftwaffe.

    This book covers all the fighter aircraft in the Romanian Air Force during World War II. The fighter aircraft inventory included British, German, Polish, and locally designed airplanes, plus captured soviet airplanes, yielding to a rather varied set of camouflage styles. Specifically, the book covers the Hawker Hurricane, Bf 109E and 109G, He 112, Bf 110G, PZL 11 and PZL 24, IAR 80/81, plus captured Mig-3, I-16 and Fw-190A/F.

    The book has chapters for each aircraft type in detail, including a brief history of the aircraft service in the Romanian Air Force before moving into a section on camouflage and markings for the given aircraft being depicted in the chapter. This section also includes information on lettering, numbers and factory logos applied to each aircraft.

    After the section on camouflage styles and markings, the main feature of each chapter follows: numerous and gorgeous color profiles (sometime even 3-view or 4-views) of different aircrafts, next to a historical picture of the airplane, which in some cases is in color, but in most cases is in black and white.

    Finally the book has a few appendixes covering details on Romanian Air Force ranks, paints and colors used in the aircrafts (including color code and FS equivalent) and a very detailed section on the evolution of the Romanian Air Force markings, including both Axis and Allied markings.

    I’ve truly enjoyed reading this book. The information provided on it makes it very valuable to the modeler and several of the pictures have not been published before.

    I know that I will add more Romanian models to my collection now that I have what could be the definite reference on the Romanian Fighters in World War II.

  • SAMI 12 2010 • 2013-09-23
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  • www.scalemodellingnow.com • 2013-09-23

    Reviewed by Jamie Haggo

    The Romanian Air Force flew a diverse bunch of aircraft from both sides of the conflict through the mid – late stages of the Second World War. These aircraft have been comprehensively documented in this new book from MMP.

    The book is broken down into 2 halves dealing with both fighters and captured aircraft; this is then further broken down into chapters dealing with each type. Not only is the operational history of each aircraft described in depth but the text also singles out aces, notable pilots and their exploits, I am very interested in the air war on the Eastern Front and have read extensively about fighter operations in this theatre but I learnt an awful lot practically on every page.

    To go along with the text, MMP have printed many photographs which are a god send to modellers who are after authentically weathered finishes for their models. To go along with these are some absolutely stunningly beautiful profiles which provide some real inspiration, in fact by the time I got to the end of the book I had enough potential projects in my head to fill my display cabinet about 3 times over.

    I hope the decal manufacturers have picked up a copy as some very interesting sheets could be produced. To help them along the way are diagrams at the back of the book with all the colours and dimensions of all the markings.

    In summary this is a fantastic book. At £25 it’s not cheap but this is a top quality product and in my opinion is very much worth the asking price. I cannot recommend this book highly enough and I for one hope that MMP produce more in this format.

  • scaleplasticandrail.com • 2013-09-23

    I've always had a really soft spot for the Romanian Air Force and its service in WW2. Flying at differing periods with Polish, British, German and their own indigenous Romanian aircraft, they flew initially with the Axis, then later with the Allies, they often found themselves facing much stronger opponents but always seemed to perform with a great deal of credit.Not only this, but their aircraft always seemed to carry interesting markings and make for good modelling subjects.

    For most modellers, the most readily available book on the subject is "Rumanian Aces of World War 2" from the Osprey 'Aircraft of the Aces' range . However, MMP have now released a book that is likely to become the standard reference for Romanian aircraft enthusiasts. Over nearly 200 pages, the two authors take the reader through the many different aircraft types flown by the Romanian pilots; each section starts with the operational history, then is illustrated with original photographs (some of which are in colour) and a multitude of colour profiles, each supported by its own reference photograph(s).

    I will now show a few examples of the aircraft types covered:

    PZL P.11f (below)

    Several models of the PZL P.11 series were purchased in the period 1932 -36. When the first campaign started in June 1941, two groups of Flotila 3 Vânătoare were equipped with these aircraft.After the campaign, they were relegated to training duties.

    Hawker Hurricane I (above)

    Only 12 Hurricanes were delivered to Romania in 1938, which equipped Escadrila 53 Vânătoare. On 23rd June, 1941, a Hurricane pilot became the first wartime aviation hero; Lt. Av. Horia Agarici attacked 7 Soviet bombers attacking Constanta harbour. Despite his aircraft undergoing repair and having no engine cowlings fitted whatsoever, he took off on his own accord and then shot down three of the bombers.

    Heinkel He 112E (below)

    30 of these beautiful little aircraft, sadly rarely released as models in any scale, were supplied from Germany in August 1939. They saw plenty of service at the front in the period June - October, 1941; they then were used for tactical reconnaissance and coastal defence over the Black Sea and saw a very limited use as night fighters.

    IAR 80 and 81 Series (above and below)

    The classical home produced fighter of the Romanian air force, they were introduced into service in February 1941 and saw service for the rest of WW2. With nearly a 2:1 kill to loss ratio over this period, the aircraft performed really well in the hands of competent pilots. Many incidents stand out, not least on the 10th June 1944 when 23 of the IAR 81C aircraft of Grupul 6 Vânătoare took part in a mad, whirling dogfight with a much larger force of P-38 Lightnings of the 15th US Air Force, mostly at an altitude below 100m; for the loss of only three Romanian pilots, no less than 23 P-38s were claimed shot down!

    Messerschmitt Bf 109E (above)

    50 109Es were delivered by Spring 1941 and more in January 1942. they were extremely popular with their pilots. Their most memorable period was their activity at the front during the Battle for Stalingrad in Autumn and Winter, 1942

    Messerschmitt Bf 109G (both below)

    Entering service in March 1943 and serving until the end of the war, the 109G was the most popular fighter in the Romanian armoury and was flown by nearly all of the Romanian aces. On 16th August 1943, Ofiter de echipaj cl.III Ion Milu in a 109G became the only Romanian pilot to shoot down five aircraft in a single day.

    Polikarpov I-16 (below)

    The I-16 is shown as a representative of the many less common types flown by the Romanian air force; this was a captured aircraft pressed into service in the late summer of 1941.

    There are many other types covered in the book; I hope the examples shown above give a flavour of just how packed with good modelling reference this book is. It is full of interesting history and well researched profiles.

    It is well written, slightly factual in nature, but this approach does suit the style of the presentation and layout of the book.

    So what do we think?

    Any book which has a large focus on two of my favourite WW2 "unsung heroes", the Heinkel 112 and the IAR 80, will usually get my vote. This book is worthy of much more than that, however; I genuinely believe it is close to being a classic on the subject.

    Overall: 9.5/10

  • Scale Views 01/2011 • 2013-09-23
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  • Amazon.com customer review (5th) • 2013-09-23
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  • Amazon.com customer review (2) • 2013-09-23

    5.0 out of 5 stars An unusual group of aircraft, March 17, 2011

    By John Matlock "Gunny" (Winnemucca, NV)

    Romania was in an interesting position during World War II. It is sandwiched between Germany (Well, Germany as it was at that time.) and Russia. As the war was starting they were flying Polish PZL fighters. At the beginning of the war they received more modern equipment: Hurricanes from England, Heinkel 112E's and Messerschmitt Bf 109's from Germany and the locally produced IAR 80's and 81's. Later in the war they upgraded these aircraft to Bf 109G's, and Me 110's.

    This book discusses these aircraft, with particular concern with the dolors and markings used by the Romanian Air Force. It is a very well done book, up to the usual high standards of this series from MMP.

  • Flugzeug Classic 03/2011 • 2013-09-23
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  • Amazon.com customer review (3) • 2013-09-23

    By exocet1

    This is an excellent source for the military modeler especially when working on Romanian fighters of WW2. Lots of color drawings and plenty of information.

  • Aeroplane 6/2011 • 2013-09-23
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  • Amazon.com customer review (3) • 2013-09-23

    5.0 out of 5 stars An unusual group of aircraft,

    March 17, 2011 By John Matlock

    Romania was in an interesting position during World War II. It is sandwiched between Germany (Well, Germany as it was at that time.) and Russia. As the war was starting they were flying Polish PZL fighters. At the beginning of the war they received more modern equipment: Hurricanes from England, Heinkel 112E's and Messerschmitt Bf 109's from Germany and the locally produced IAR 80's and 81's. Later in the war they upgraded these aircraft to Bf 109G's, and Me 110's.

    This book discusses these aircraft, with particular concern with the dolors and markings used by the Romanian Air Force. It is a very well done book, up to the usual high standards of this series from MMP.

  • Skrzydlata Polska 11/2010 • 2010-11-18
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